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3rd Annual Day of Learning

Join us for our 3rd Annual Day of Learning!

About this Event

Canopy Support Services presents our 3rd Annual Day of Learning. We are proud and excited to offer a day of learning and engagement with professionals in the field of ABA .

The schedule includes 4 presentations, live Q&A with each presenter and 6 CEUs available.


Presenter: Dr. J. Lucyshyn

Topic: Family Centred PBS: Lessons Learned for Promoting Transformational Change in Child & Family Lives

Topic Overview and Learning Objectives:

The theory and aims of a family centred positive behaviour support (FCPBS) approach will be briefly described, and three lessons about promoting transformational change in child and family lives will be discussed and illustrated: (a) supplementing a functional assessment with a coercive process assessment; (b) enhancing contextual fit by conducting an ecology assessment; and (c) embodying a collaborative model of training and support.

Learning Objectives:

1. Define the five characteristics of survivable interventions

2. Define and describe one common coercive process and its alternative constructive process.

3. List and define six principles of collaborative partnerships

Presentation Length: 75 minutes

CEU’s Available: 1.5


Presenter: Dr. Sarah Dunkel-Jackson, PhD, BCBA-D, LBA Researcher and Professor at Michigan State University

Biography:

Dr. Sarah Dunkel-Jackson began her career as a psychology/special education major at Grand Valley State University and obtained her MS and PhD in Behavior Analysis and Therapy from Southern Illinois University. As a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the Doctoral level (BCBA-D), she served as a behavior analyst, director, and consultant for US and Canadian schools and agencies serving children and adults with complex special needs. Dr. Dunkel-Jackson teaches child development and behavior analysis courses and conducts research with interests in functional behavior assessment, social-emotional regulation, sports, training and development, and verbal behavior. Dr. Dunkel-Jackson is currently supporting the Research in Autism and Developmental Disabilities (RADD) Lab at Michigan State University (https://raddlab.hdfs.msu.edu).

Topic: Inter-professional Collaboration

Topic Overview and Learning Objectives:

Inter-professional collaboration can be a powerful component of the services we provide to clients, families, professionals, and our field. When consulting with teams, we engage in professional skills such as “collaboration” to encourage greater outcomes while maintaining our reliance on evidence-based best practices. Barriers to effective collaboration can include our philosophical foundations, the language we use, and our previous experiences—and many can be overcome with simple collaboration strategies. When “resistance” persists among teams, we can reach for our evidence-based strategies and assess the maintaining variables and reasons of such misbehavior of the team. This helps us develop innovative, function-based interventions to improve team collaboration. This presentation will highlight a few case examples of inter-professional collaboration in support of individuals with developmental disabilities.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe the importance of inter-professional collaboration when providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities.

2. Identify common barriers to effective collaboration among inter-professional teams.

3. Describe ways of improving inter-professional collaboration while analyzing case studies involving teams that support individuals with developmental disabilities.

Presentation Length: 75 minutes

CEU’s Available: 1.5


Presenter: Albert Malkin

Biography:

Albert is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Western University, in the MPEd in the Field of Applied Behavior Analysis program. He is currently a PhD Candidate at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, within the Department of Psychology in the Behaviour Analysis and Therapy program. He is certified as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and earned his Master of Arts degree from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, majoring in Clinical Psychology with a specialization in Applied Behavior Analysis.

His current research interests include: the influence of language on socially important phenomena; practices in pedagogy; applied quantitative analysis of behaviour; health, sports, and fitness; social responsibility; and the psychometric validation of behaviour analytic assessment protocols.

He has many years of research and practice with a focus on behavioral supports and services for individuals with developmental disabilities, and teaching experience across the undergraduate, graduate, and college levels. He is also actively involved in the local behaviour analytic community and has served as the President of the Ontario Association for Behaviour Analysis (ONTABA).

Topic: Overview of Acceptance and Commitment Training for the Workplace

Topic Overview and Learning Objectives:

Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) is an empirically based intervention that uses acceptance and mindfulness strategies, together with commitment and behavior change strategies, to increase psychological flexibility. The purpose of this session is to provide participants with an experiential overview of the processes involved in ACT. Experiential activities will focus on applications of ACT in the workplace as both self-care and for the purpose of improving workplace performance.

Learning Objectives:

1. Identify & give examples of ACT Processes

2. Describe applications of ACT to improve their own workplace tasks

3. Describe applications of ACT to work with supervisees to improve performance

Presentation Length: 75 minutes

CEU’s Available: 1.5


Presenter: Gabrielle Lee

Biography:

Gabrielle is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Education at Western University. She is a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral and a licensed psychologist (registered in Michigan, USA). Her research focuses on behavior-analytic intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities.

Topic: Symbolic Play

Topic Overview and Learning Objectives:

Symbolic play is important in child development. Children with autism spectrum disorder often lack symbolic play skills. In this talk, I will introduce the analysis and teaching procedures for three basic forms of symbolic play: object substitutions, attribution of pretend properties, and imaginary objects.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe three basic forms of symbolic play and their behavioral processes.

2. Assess children’s symbolic play skills and conduct the teaching procedures.

Presentation Length: 75 minutes

CEU’s Available: 1.5

Click Here to Register for this Event!